The 2015 Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching

Designed to recognize and promote hands-on math teaching in upper elementary and middle school classrooms, the Rosenthal Prize carries a cash award of $25,000 for the single best activity, plus up to five additional monetary awards for other innovative activities.  The winning teacher(s) will have the opportunity to share their innovative activities with educators across the country.  Click here to learn more.

Curious about the prize?  Download the 2015 Rosenthal Prize applicant kit and watch the application workshop from May 1.

The application process for the 2015 Rosenthal Prize has closed.  Selected finalists have been notified and invited to complete the final application.

Congratulations to the 2014 Rosenthal Prize winner!

Congratulations to Ralph Pantozzi, the winner of the 2014 Rosenthal Prize of Innovation in Math Teaching!  Ralph, a teacher at Kent Place School in Summit, NJ, was awarded a $25,000 cash prize.

See a short video from Random Walk, Ralph’s winning lesson, here.

NCTM Regional Conference (Atlantic City) attendees can see Ralph present a workshop on his winning lesson and attend a meet and greet with him.  See more details here, under “Be Inspired by Leaders in Mathematics.”  His featured session will take place on Thursday, October 22, from 9:30 am – 10:30 am in the Atlantic City Convention Center, Room 420.

Ralph will attend a meet and greet later that evening with conference attendees who would like to learn more about the Rosenthal Prize. Details to be posted here and on social media.

Saul Rosenthal (Trustee and Sponsor) and Ralph Pantozzi (winner) pose for a photo at the announcement of the winner of the third annual Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching.

Congratulations to the 2013 Rosenthal Prize winners!

Congratulations to Trang Vu and Brent Ferguson, respectively the winner and runner-up of the 2013 Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching! Trang, a teacher at La Jolla High School in La Jolla, CA, was awarded a $25,000 cash prize, and Brent, a teacher at The Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, NJ, was awarded a $10,000 cash prize.

Brent Ferguson (runner-up), Saul Rosenthal (Trustee and Sponsor), and Trang Vu (winner) pose for a photo at the announcement of the winner of the second annual Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching.

Congratulations to the 2012 Rosenthal Prize winners!

Congratulations to Scott Goldthorp and Patrick Honner, respectively the winner and runner-up of the 2012 Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching! Scott, a teacher at Rosa International Middle School in Cherry Hill, NJ, was awarded a $25,000 cash prize, and Patrick, a teacher at Brooklyn Technical High School in Brooklyn, NY, was awarded a $10,000 cash prize.

Download Scott Goldthorp’s winning lesson plan, “Hands-On Data Analysis.”

Download Patrick Honner’s runner-up lesson plan, “Sphere Dressing.”

Patrick Honner (runner-up), Saul Rosenthal (Trustee and Sponsor), and Scott Goldthorp (winner) pose for a photo at the announcement of the winner of the first annual Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Mathematics Teaching.

About the Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching

The annual Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching is designed to recognize and promote hands-on math teaching in the upper elementary and middle school classrooms. Each year, the winning teacher is awarded a cash prize of $25,000, and and the winning activity is shared with interested teachers across the country.

The Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching has four goals:

  • To recognize and reward exceptional 4th through 12th grade teachers who employ innovation(s) appropriate to the upper elementary or middle school classroom.
  • To demonstrate to the education profession and the general public that innovative math teaching exists and can successfully reach the middle grades.
  • To replicate the successful innovative activity of the winning teacher, distribute it to classrooms across the country, and positively impact math education in the United States.
  • To encourage innovation and incorporation of hands-on methods in classrooms around the country.